Construction Industry in Gurgaon: Living and Working Condition of the Workers

Construction Industry in Gurgaon: Living and Working Condition of the Workers

The construction industry is the single biggest non-agricultural industry in the capitalist world. Construction sector is next to Agriculture, is the second largest economic activity in India in terms of employment and plays an important role in the nation’s economy. The performance of other sectors of the economy is interlinked with this industry which generates demand for both skilled and semi-skilled labour force. Around 16% of the nation’s working population depends on it for their livelihood.

According to the Planning Commission’s Approach to 12th Five Year Plan the contribution to the GDP by construction sector rose from Rs. 28,77,701 (2005) to Rs.49,33,183 (2009). In terms of percentage, the contribution of Construction sector to total GDP increases from 7.4 % (2005) to 8.9% (2009) — thus Construction sector accounts for around 9.0 per cent of GDP today.

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A Study of the Contract Labour System in the Garment Industry in Gurgaon

A Study of the Contract Labour System in the Garment Industry in Gurgaon

Haryana State is one of the fastest growing states in India. The GDP was Rs 2, 162,870 million in 2009-2010 and Rs 2,577,930 million in 2010-2011, an increase of 19% in a single year. This reflects an increasing trend of economic growth in Haryana over the last decade despite the global downturn and its impact on the export/foreign investment-oriented industries that now characterise the economy of the state. In keeping with the neo liberal economic policies introduced in India during the early 1990s, the state has attracted investment through various incentives to the industrial sectors, embarking on the industrialisation of an economy that had traditionally been based on agriculture. Industry in Haryana is highly dependent on a migrant workforce that has flooded in to the state along with its phenomenal economic growth.

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Gurgaon: How the Other Half Lives a Report on Labour and Development in Gurgaon

Gurgaon: How the Other Half Lives a Report on Labour and Development in Gurgaon

This report is made possible by three organisations: the Society for Labour & Development (SLD) and the Indian Social Institute (ISI), both in Delhi, and Mazdoor Ekta Manch in Gurgaon. The need for this study was identified in the course of the founding of Mazdoor Ekta Manch (MEM) – “Workers’ Unity Platform”.

Mazdoor Ekta Manch has been organising in Gurgaon since 2008, with the support of the Society for Labour & Development. In the process of supporting the establishment of MEM, SLD recognized that very little documentation was available about the social and living conditions of the working class population, and the impact on that population of the policies of the government and private authorities and agencies around them. Indeed, the Haryana government does not have any useful data on the working class in their State. SLD and ISI decided to collaborate on a research project to better understand the invisible Gurgaon, where the majority of the population lives and works every day.

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In Search for Work: India to Middle East to the United States

It is fair to say that international migration of Indians, especially working class Indians, is necessitated by the policies adopted by the Indian government in this neo-liberal era. Most of such migrant workers are vulnerable to untold exploitation by their employers in foreign countries. They often work like slaves to fulfill their commitments to families and society. Earlier workers migrated mostly to the Middle East and other developed Asian countries.

In a country like India, with high unemployment and poverty, remittances of Indian workers working abroad play a very important role. The Indian economy benefits greatly from the foreign exchange sent home by the Non-Resident Indians – in fact, remittances are second to Foreign Direct Investment in terms of revenue.

Only recently, Indian skilled working class people have started going to the US. Along with the change in destination has come a greater hope for prosperity from working in one of the richest countries.

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Prescription for an Unhealthy India Private Corporate Healthcare and Its Empty Promises

Private health care in India has been growing at an unprecedented rate propelled by globalisation and its impact on the political economy of health. This privatisation in health care has led to the emergence of corporate hospitals and an intricate network of health enterprises. The costs of healthcare in these private hospitals, particularly their burden on low-income households in India has been much discussed among health and development practitioners.

However, apart from the issue of cost, there remain other issues that continue to be unaddressed. These pertain to the impacts of the rise of these hospitals in the context of India’s changing neo-liberal environment. They are particularly visible through the dynamics of employee welfare and patient care within the hospitals, the reality of claims made by the hospital management, accessibility and affordability issues in health in these hospitals and through regional satellite centres and clinics, the quality of hospital processes and accreditation, and the impact of this health care system on the unmet burden of disease.

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